| Human Nature Review | What's New | Search | Archive | Feedback | Contact Us |

News in Brain and Behavioural Sciences
The weekly edition of The Human Nature Daily Review
Volume 3: Issue 96 - 19th May, 2003 - http://human-nature.com/nibbs/

If you no longer wish to receive this newsletter send a blank email here.
To subscribe send a blank email here.

NEWS & VIEWS

Sex differences (18 May) - She gets a tooth pulled, then drives herself home, makes dinner for four, does the laundry and helps the kids with their homework. He gets a tooth pulled and his universe slams to a halt, as he waits for the pain to go away. Caricatures? Sure. But the debate over who can really stand more pain has been one of the more interesting battles of the sexes, spanning generations. [more]



Psychology - religion (9 May) - Psychology and religion work in much the same territory, wrestling with big questions about personal meaning, relationships and life. Commentator Aaron Freeman found that, for his family, religion is psychology. [more]


Attraction (17 May) - You're 40, happily married - and then you meet your long-lost brother and fall passionately in love. This isn't fiction; in the age of the sperm donor, it's a growing reality: 50% of reunions between siblings, or parents and offspring, separated at birth result in obsessive emotions. [more]


Happiness (17 May) - In 1968, an American president said: "In the next 20 years we shall become much richer, but will we really be any richer as people - happier?" That Richard Nixon was the author of these words should not distract from their wisdom: beyond a certain point, greater affluence does not increase happiness or mental health. [more]


Artificial intelligence (13 May) - "AI has been brain-dead since the 1970s," said AI guru Marvin Minsky in a recent speech at Boston University. Minsky co-founded the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in 1959 with John McCarthy. [more]


Archaeology - politics (16 May) - The repatriation of human remains currently held in UK museums and universities to indigenous peoples around the world will do immense damage to science. [more] and [more]



Search Now:
 
In Association with Amazon.co.uk

Race (13 May) - In the current atmosphere of race doublespeak "Race: The Power of an Illusion" (premiering Thursday, April 24, 10 p.m. on PBS) is one of the most important, sweeping and groundbreaking documentaries in recent memory. [more] and [more]


Stem cell politics - medicine - Will George W. Bush's religious views prevent all but the wealthiest Americans from receiving treatment for incurable illnesses? [more]


Human nature (15 May) - Biologist Robin Dunbar talks to Andrew Brown about lonely hearts ads, Shakespeare and what makes us human. [more]


Diet - genetics (15 May) - First it was smart drugs. Now it's smart diets. Bruce Grierson on what your genes want you to eat. [more]


Robotics (15 May) - The nerve center of a conventional robot is a microprocessor of silicon and metal. But for a robot under development at Georgia Tech, commands are relayed by 2,000 or so cells from a rat's brain. [more]


Archaeology (14 May) - The quarry where Britain's oldest human-like remains were found has been bought by English Heritage to enable further digging and conservation work at the site. [more]


Gulf War Syndrome (14 May) - As U.S. and allied soldiers in Iraq face the constant danger of chemical and biological weapons, scientists are still trying to figure out why some veterans of the last gulf war returned home with mysterious symptoms and brain damage. [more]


Autism (14 May) - Diagnoses of autism have nearly doubled in the last four years among children in California, state officials reported yesterday. They said they could not explain the increase. [more]



Race (13 May) - The recently completed Human Genome Sequencing Project has confirmed what many scientists knew all along - that humans don't fit the biological criteria that defines race. [more]


Language - human evolution (13 May) - Could it be that the tiny changes in the FOXP2 gene helped to set our distant ancestors on the evolutionary trajectory that has led to modern human culture? [more


Human genetics (13 May) - A new map of human variation will greatly aid research on the genetic origins of disease. [more]


Francis Crick (13 May) - Early studies of the Crick papers are casting new light on one of the discoverers of the double helix. [more]

RESEARCH & COMMENTARY

Neuroscience - dyslexia (18 May) - Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain activity in children, researchers today confirmed part of an eighty-year-old theory on the neurobiological basis of reading disability, and shed new light on brain regions that change as children become accomplished readers. [more]


EuroNews BBC News   Channel Four News (UK) CBC News (Canada) ABC News (Australia) FeedRoom (US) Deutsche Welle RTÉ News (Ireland) CBS News (US) BBC News 24 BBC Newsnight BBC Question Time BBC Radio Player, BBC World Service, Today, Newshour, The World Today, Radio Netherlands, NPR Hourly News, Talk of the Nation, Science in Action, Discovery, One Planet, The Material World, Thinking Allowed, Heart and Soul, Case Notes, Health Matters, Everywoman United Nations US Congress UK Parliament.

Audio and Video

Politics - democracy (18 May) - Democrats should accept that some political deception is not only inevitable in a democracy but can be legitimate where it is conducted by elected politicians in the public interest where they have the tacit support of the electorate. That is the key conclusion of Dr Glen Newey, a reader in politics at Strathclyde University, in his new research which is published today. The research was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. [more]


Animal cognition (16 May) - Baby seals can recognize their mother's voice in the hubbub of large dense breeding colonies as early as two days after birth, according to a study published in the current issue of the journal Animal Behavior. [more]


Depression (16 May) - Phone calls can help primary care doctors and nurses deliver follow-up care to patients who are depressed, a new study suggests. [more]


Schizophrenia (15 May) - Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a genetic flaw in a family suffering with schizophrenia that may help to explain an important biochemical process implicated in the onset of the disease. [more]


Aging (15 May) - In studies of the powerfully informative roundworm, C. elegans, UCSF scientists have discovered that a class of molecules found in the worms and in people can both prolong life in the worm and prevent the harmful accumulation of abnormal proteins that cause a debilitating Huntington's-like disease. The finding appears to be the first evidence in an animal of a link between aging and age-related disease. [more]


Economics (14 May) - The stock market has its share of shakeups, but who would guess that large movements in this man-made system adhere to a similar pattern of predictability as earthquake magnitudes? [more]


Vision (14 May) - Researchers at UC Davis are challenging the conventional view of how connections form between the optic nerves and the brain. [more]


Karl Pearson - Pearson made contributions to statistics and other quantitative disciplines but also had interests in religion, politics, literary criticism, philosophy of science, Darwinism, biology, history, freethought, evolution, genetics, socialism, anthropology, eugenics, and emancipation of women. Being the chairman of a first class academic department and the managing editor of a major journal, Pearson sometimes used his power to the detriment of other important scientists, such as R. A. Fisher and Jerzy Neyman, and this article also brings out this unfortunate characteristic of his personality. [more] and [more]


Human evolution (12 May) - Neanderthals did not contribute to the gene pool of modern humans, according to a recent study that compared the DNA of two ancient Cro-Magnons with that of four Neanderthals. Discovery News, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, BBC News Online, National Geographic News, Science News.


Schizophrenia (12 May) - New results indicate that in drug-naive schizophrenic patients the extrastriatal dopamine D2/3 receptor density is markedly decreased. There are also negative correlations between D2/3 receptor density and age among controls, and between D2/3 density and negative and general psychopathological symptom scores among patients. These results support the previous hypothesis on dysfunction of mesocortical dopamine function behind the cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. [more]


Anorexia nervosa (12 May) - Two genes in the chromosome 1 region, HTR1D, the gene that codes for the serotonin 1D receptor, and OPRD1, the gene that codes for the delta opioid receptor, demonstrate statistically significant association to anorexia nervosa. [more]


Stress - development (12 May) - Center for Behavioral Neuroscience researchers have demonstrated that genetically identical mice placed in different environments both pre- and post-natally differ dramatically as adults in their stress responses and learning abilities. [more]


Infant crying (12 May) - Infants are born into an uncertain parenting environment, which can range from indulgent care of offspring to infanticide. Infant cries are in large part adaptations that maintain proximity to and elicit care from caregivers. There is not strong evidence for acoustically distinct cry types, however, but infant cries may function as a graded signal. [more]


Politics - media (12 May) - Television news programmes may be contributing to current political apathy, according to a new report funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. An in-depth study of more than 5600 TV news reports in both Britain and the US between September 2001 and February 2002 reveals that the news media may be encouraging a disengaged citizenry by representing the public as generally passive and apolitical. [more]


Genetics (12 May) - An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Stanford University and Tel Aviv University has developed the first computational method that can identify clusters of genes responsible for controlling processes within a cell, when those clusters become active, and, most importantly, how the clusters are regulated. [more]


Development (9 May) - New research findings on the ability of a fetus to recognize its mother's voice and even distinguish it from other female voices confirms what scientists have speculated about for more than 20 years - that experiences in the womb help shape newborn preferences and behaviour. [more]

REVIEWS & DISCUSSION

Nature - nurture - Margo Wilson reviews Nature via Nurture: Genes, Experience, & What Makes Us Human by Matt Ridley. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Search Now:
 
In Association with Amazon.com

Romance - Jim Holt reviews On the Nature of Human Romantic Interaction by Karl Iagnemma. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Wealth - Catherine Bennett reviews The Natural History of the Rich by Richard Conniff. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Teenagers - Lavinia Greenlaw reviews Why Are They So Weird? What's Really Going On In A Teenager's Brain by Barbara Strauch [more] and  Branded: The Buying and Selling of Teenagers by Alissa Quart. [more] [review]


Eating disorders - Francis Rumsey reviews A Starving Madness: Tales of Hunger, Hope and Healing in Psychotherapy by Judith Ruskay Rabinor. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Autobiography - ecology - James Brody reviews Ecology of a Cracker Childhood by Janisse Ray. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Trauma - Sally Satel reviews Remembering Trauma by Richard J. McNally. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Reason - William D. Casebeer reviews The Evolution of Reason: Logic as a Branch of Biology by William S. Cooper. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Neuroscience - Simon Blackburn reviews Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow and the Feeling Brain by Antonio Damasio. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada


Psychiatry - A conference on 'The Limits of Psychiatry' will take place on Friday 13th June, 2003 in Westminster, London. [more]


Darwin - The second volume of Janet Browne's epic biography of Charles Darwin reveals a man more complex - and interesting - than is usually portrayed. Biologist Theodosious Dhobzansky once said, "Nothing in biology makes sense except in light of evolution." While the physical sciences can point to Newtonian mechanics, relativity and quantum mechanics as their grand overarching theories, the life sciences, arguably, just have evolution. And for most of us evolution means one man: Charles Darwin. [more] [review]

Buy this book from Amazon
Amazon United States of America  Amazon United Kingdom  Amazon France  Amazon Deutschland  Amazon Japan  Amazon Canada